30 60 90 Special Triangles: Geometry

Hi everyone and welcome to MathSux! In this post we are going to break down 30 60 90 degree special triangles. What is it? Where did it come from? What are the ratios of it’s side lengths and how to do we use them? You will find all of the answers to these questions below. Also, don’t forget to check out the video below and practice questions at the end of this post. Happy calculating! 🙂

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What is a 30 60 90 Triangle and why is it “Special”?

The 30 60 90 triangle is special because it forms an equilateral triangle when a mirror image of itself is drawn, meaning all sides are equal!  This allows us to find the ratio between each side of the triangle by using the Pythagorean theorem. Check it out below!

30 60 90 Special Triangles

Now let’s draw a mirror image of our triangle.  Next, we can label the length of the new side opposite 30º “a,” and add this new mirror image length with the original we had to get, a+a=2a.

30 60 90 Special Triangles
30 60 90 Special Triangles

If we look at our original 30 60 90 triangle, we now have the following values for each side based on our equilateral triangle:

30 60 90 Special Triangles
30 60 90 Special Triangles

Now we can re-label our triangle, knowing the length of the hypotenuse in relation to the two legs. This creates a ratio that applies to all 30 60 90 triangles!

30 60 90 triangle side lengths

How do I use this ratio?

30 60 90 triangle side lengths

Knowing the above ratio, allows us to find any length of any and every 30 60 90 triangle, when given the value of one of its sides.

Let’s try an Example:

30 60 90 triangle side lengths

-> First let’s look at our ratio and compare it to our given triangle.

30 60 90 triangle side lengths

->Notice we are given the value of a, which equals 4, knowing this we can now fill in each length of our triangle based on the ratio of a 30 60 90 triangle.

30 60 90 triangle side lengths
30 60 90 triangle side lengths

Now let’s look at an Example where we are given the length of the hypotenuse and need to find the values of the other two missing sides.

30 60 90 triangle side lengths

->First let’s look at our ratio and compare it to our given triangle.

30 60 90 triangle side lengths

-> Notice we are given the value of the hypotenuse, 2a=20. Knowing this we can find the value of a by dividing 20 by 2 to get a=10. Once we have the value of a=10, we can easily find the length of the last leg based on the 30 60 90 ratio:

30 60 90 triangle side lengths
30 60 90 triangle side lengths

Now for our last Example, when we are given the side length across from 60º and need to find the other two missing sides.

30 60 90 triangle side lengths

->First let’s look at our ratio and compare it to our given triangle.

30 60 90 triangle side lengths

-> In this case, we need to use little algebra to find the value of a, using the ratio for 30 60 90 triangles.

30 60 90 triangle side lengths

Now that we have one piece of the puzzle, the value of a, let’s fill it in our triangle below:

Finally, let’s find the value of the length of the hypotenuse, which is equal to 2a.

Practice Questions:

Find the value of the missing sides of each 30 60 90 degree triangle.

Solutions:

Still got questions? No problem! Don’t hesitate to comment with any questions or check out the video above. Happy calculating! 🙂

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Looking to review 45 45 90 degree special triangles? Check out this post here!

Central Angles Theorems: Geometry

Hi everyone, and welcome to MathSux! In this post, we are going to go over the Central Angles Theorems of circles. We’ll go over the theorems associated with central angles and then solve a quick example. Make sure to test your understanding of central angles and arcs with the practice questions at the end of this post. And, if you want more, don’t forget to check out the video below, happy calculating!

Central Angles and Arcs:

Central angles and arcs form when two radii are drawn from the center point of a circle.  When these two radii come together they form a central angle. A central angle is equal to the length of the arc. When it comes to measuring the central angle, the central angle is always equal to arc length and vice versa:

Central Angles = Arc Length

central angles theorems

Central Angle Theorems:

There are a two central angle theorems to know, check them out below!

Central Angle Theorem #1:

central angles theorems

Central Angle Theorem #2:

central angles theorems

Let’s look at how to apply these rules with an Example:

central angles theorems

Let’s do this one step at a time.

central angles theorems
central angles theorems
central angles theorems
central angles theorems
central angles theorems
central angles theorems

Practice Questions:

Solutions:

Still got questions? No problem! Don’t hesitate to comment with any questions or check out the video above. Happy calculating! 🙂

*Also, if you want to check out Intersecting Secants click this link here!

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TikTok Math Video Compilations

Happy December everyone! With crazy 2020 coming to an end, I thought I would share some TikTok math video compilations of Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2/Trig, and Statistics for a quick review of all our videos posted throughout the year. Enjoy these TikTok math video compilations and happy calculating! 🙂

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TikTok Math Video Compilations

Algebra:

Within algebra, you will find arithmetic sequences, combining like terms, box and whisker plots, geometric sequences, solving radical equations, completing the square, 4 ways to factor quadratic equations, piecewise functions and more!

Geometry:

Within Geometry, you will find, how to construct an equilateral triangle, a median of a trapezoid, area of a sector, how to find perpendicular and parallel lines through a given point, SOH CAH TOA right triangle trigonometry, reflections, and more!

Algebra 2/Trig.

Within Algebra 2/Trig., you will find, how to expand a cubed binomial, how to divide polynomials, how to solve log equations, imaginary numbers, synthetic division, unit circle basics, how to graph y=sin(x), and more!

Statistics:

Within statistics, you will find, box and whisker plots, how to find the variance, and, the probability of flipping a coin 2 times!

For full length video, don’t forget to check out our free math video index page! Thanks for stopping by! 🙂

Rotations about a Point: Geometry

rotations about a point

Happy Wednesday math friends! In this post we’re going to dive into rotations about a point! In this post we will be rotating points, segments, and shapes, learn the difference between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations, derive rotation rules, and even use a protractor and ruler to find rotated points. The fun doesn’t end there though, check out the video and practice questions below for even more! And as always happy calculating! 🙂

What are Rotations?

Rotations are a type of transformation in geometry where we take a point, line, or shape and rotate it clockwise or counterclockwise, usually by 90º,180º, 270º, -90º, -180º, or -270º.

A positive degree rotation runs counter clockwise and a negative degree rotation runs clockwise.  Let’s take a look at the difference in rotation types below and notice the different directions each rotation goes:

rotations 90 degrees

How do we rotate a shape?

There are a couple of ways to do this take a look at our choices below:

  1. We can visualize the rotation or use tracing paper to map it out and rotate by hand.
  2. Use a protractor and measure out the needed rotation.
  3. Know the rotation rules mapped out below.  Yes, it’s memorizing but if you need more options check out numbers 1 and 2 above!

Rotation Rules:

rotations 90 degrees

Where did these rules come from?

To derive our rotation rules, we can take a look at our first example, when we rotated triangle ABC 90º counterclockwise about the origin. If we compare our coordinate point for triangle ABC before and after the rotation we can see a pattern, check it out below:

rotations

The rotation rules above only apply to those being rotated about the origin (the point (0,0)) on the coordinate plane.  But points, lines, and shapes can be rotates by any point (not just the origin)!  When that happens, we need to use our protractor and/or knowledge of rotations to help us find the answer. Let’s take a look at the Examples below:

Example #1:

rotations

Step 1: First, let’s look at our point of rotation, notice it is not the origin we rotating about but point k!  To understand where our triangle is in relation to point k, let’s draw an x and y axes starting at this point:

rotations

Step 2: Now let’s look at the coordinate point of our triangle, using our new axes that start at point k.

Step 2: Next, let’s take a look at our rule for rotating a coordinate -90º and apply it to our newly rotated triangles coordinates:

rotations

Step 3: Now let’s graph our newly found coordinate points for our new triangle .

rotations about a point

Step 4: Finally let’s connect all our new coordinates to form our solution:

rotations about a point

Another type of question with rotations, may not involve the coordinate plane at all! Let’s look at the next example:

Example #2:

rotations about a point

Step 1: First, let’s identify the point we are rotating (Point M) and the point we are rotating about (Point K).

rotations about a point

Step 2: Next we need to identify the direction of rotation.  Since we are rotating Point M 90º, we know we are going to be rotating this point to the left in the clockwise direction.

Step 3: Now we can draw a line from the point of origin, Point K, to Point M.

rotations about a point

Step 4: Now, using a protractor and ruler, measure out 90º, draw a line, and notice that point L lands on our 90º line. This is our solution! (Note: For help on how to use a protractor, check out the video above).

rotations about a point

Ready for more? Check out the practice questions below to master your rotation skills!

Practice Questions:

  1. Point B is rotated -90º about the origin. Which point represents newly rotated point B?    

2. Triangle ABC is rotated -270º about point M.  Show newly rotated triangle ABC as A prime B prime C prime.

3. Point G is rotated about point B by 180º. Which point represents newly rotated point B?

rotations about a point

4.  Segment AB is rotated 270º about point K.  Show newly rotated segment AB.

Solutions:

Still got questions on how to rotations about a point? No problem! Don’t hesitate to comment with any questions or check out the video above for even more examples. Happy calculating! 🙂

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Looking to brush up on your rotations skills? Check out this post here!

Geometry: 45º 45º 90º Special Triangles

45 45 90 triangle

Greetings math folks! In this post we are going to go over 45º 45º 90º special triangles and how to find the missing sides when given only one of its lengths. For even more examples, check out the video below and happy calculating! 🙂

Why is it “special”?

 The 45º 45º 90º triangle is special because it is an isosceles triangle, meaning it has two equal sides (marked in blue below).  If we know that the triangle has two equal lengths, we can find the value of the hypotenuse by using the Pythagorean Theorem.  Check it out below!

45 45 90 triangle

Now we can re-label our triangle, knowing the length of the hypotenuse in relation to the two equal legs. This creates a ratio that applies to all 45º 45º 90º triangles!

45 45 90 triangle

How do I use this ratio?

45 45 90 triangle

Knowing the above ratio, allows us to find any length of a 45º 45º 90º triangle, when given the value of one of its sides.

Let’s try an example:

45 45 90 triangle
45 45 90 triangle sides
45 45 90 triangle sides
45 45 90 triangle sides
45 45 90 triangle sides
45 45 90 triangle sides

Now let’s look at an example where we are given the length of the hypotenuse and need to find the values of the other two missing sides.

45 45 90 triangle sides
45 45 90 triangle formula
45 45 90 triangle formula
45 45 90 triangle formula
45 45 90 triangle formula
45 45 90 triangle formula
45 45 90 triangle formula

Now try mastering the art of the 45º 45º 90º special triangle on your own!

Practice Questions: Find the value of the missing sides.

45 45 90 triangle formula
45 45 90 triangle formula

Solutions:

45 45 90 triangle formula

Still got questions? No problem! Don’t hesitate to comment with any questions or check out the video above. Happy calculating! 🙂

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Transversals and Parallel Lines: Geometry

Happy Wednesday math friends! In this post we are going to look at transversals and parallel lines and find the oh so many congruent and supplementary angles they form when they come together! Congruent angles that form with these types of lines are more commonly known as Alternate Interior Angles, Alternate Exterior Angles, Corresponding angles, and Supplementary angles. Let’s look at this one step at a time:

What are Transversals and Parallel Lines?

When two parallel lines are cut by a diagonal line ( called a transversal) it looks something like this:

parallel lines and transversals

Each angle above has at least one congruent counterpart. There are several different types of congruent relationships that happen when a transversal cuts two parallel lines and we are going to break each down:

Transversals and parallel Lines

1) Alternate Interior Angles:

When a transversal line cuts across two parallel lines, opposite interior angles are congruent.

parallel lines and transversals

2) Alternate Exterior Angles:

When a transversal line cuts across two parallel lines, opposite exterior angles are congruent.

parallel lines and transversals

3) Corresponding Angles:

When a transversal line cuts across two parallel lines, corresponding angles are congruent.

Transversals and parallel Lines

4) Supplementary Angles:

Supplementary angles are a pair of angles that add to 180 degrees. 180 degrees is the value of distance found within a straight line, which is why you’ll find so many supplementary angles below:

parallel lines and transversals

Knowing the different sets of congruent and supplementary angles, we can easily find any missing angle values when faced with the following question:

Transversals and parallel Lines

-> Using our knowledge of congruent and supplementary angles we should be able to figure this out! Right away we can find angle 2 by noticing angle 1 and angle 2 are supplementary angles (add to 180 degrees). 

-> Knowing angle 2 is 50 degrees, we can now fill in the rest of our transversal angles based on our corresponding and supplementary rules.

Transversals and parallel Lines

Try the following transversal and parallel lines questions below! Some may a bit harder than the previous example, if you get stuck, check out the video that goes over a similar example above and happy calculating! 🙂

Practice Questions:

  1. Find the value of the missing angles given line r  is parallel to line  s and line t is a transversal. 
Transversals and parallel Lines

2. Find the value of the missing angles given line r is parallel to line s and line t is a transversal. 

Transversals and parallel Lines
Transversals and parallel Lines
Transversals and parallel Lines

Solutions:

Transversals and parallel Lines
Transversals and parallel Lines
Transversals and parallel Lines
Transversals and parallel Lines

Still got questions? No problem! Don’t hesitate to comment with any questions or check out the video above. Happy calculating! 🙂

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Also, if you’re looking to learn about the difference between parallel and perpendicular lines, check out this post here!

Reflections: Geometry

Greetings and welcome to Mathsux! Today we are going to go over reflections, one of the many types of transformations that come up in geometry.  And thankfully, it is one of the easiest transformation types to master, especially if you’re more of a visual learner/artistic type person. So let’s get to it!

What are Reflections?

Reflections on a coordinate plane are exactly what you think! When a point, a line segment, or a shape is reflected over a line it creates a mirror image.  Think the wings of a butterfly, a page being folded in half, or anywhere else where there is perfect symmetry.

Example:

Screen Shot 2020-08-04 at 5.19.40 PM

Step 1: First, let’s draw in line x=-2.

reflections

Step 2: Find the distance each point is from the line x=-2 and reflect it on the other side, measuring the same distance. First, let’s look at point C, notice it’s 1 unit away from the line x=-2, to reflect it we are going to count 1 unit to the left of the line x=-2 and label our new point, C|.

reflections

Step 3: Next we reflect point A in much the same way! Notice that point A is 2 units away on the left of line x=-2, we then measure 2 units to the right of our line and mark our new point, A|.

reflections

Step 4: Lastly, we reflect point B. This time, point B is 1 unit away on the right side of the line x=-2, we then measure 1 unit to the opposite side of our line and mark our new point, B|.

reflections

Step 5: Finally, we can now connect all of our new points, for our fully reflected triangle A|B|C|.

Practice Questions:

reflections

Solutions:

Still got questions?  No problem! Check out the video above or comment below! Happy calculating! 🙂

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Looking to review rotations about a point? Check out this post here!

Intersecting Secants Theorem: Geometry

Ahoy! Today we’re going to cover the Intersecting Secants Theorem!  If you forgot what a secant is in the first place, don’t worry because all it is a line that goes through a circle.  Not so scary right? I was never scared of lines that go through circles before, no reason to start now.

If you have any questions about anything here, don’t hesitate to comment below and check out my video for more of an explanation. Stay positive math peeps and happy calculating! 🙂

Wait, what are Secants?

Screen Shot 2020-07-14 at 10.07.54 PM

Intersecting Secants Theorem: When secants intersect an amazing thing happens! Their line segments are in proportion, meaning we can use something called the Intersecting Secants Theorem to find missing line segments.  Check it out below: 

Intersecting Secants Theorem

Let’s now see how we can apply the intersecting Secants Theorem to find missing length.

Screen Shot 2020-07-14 at 10.45.29 PM.png

Step 1: First, let’s write our formula for Intersecting Secants.

Intersecting Secants Theorem

Step 2: Now fill in our formulas with the given values and simplify.

Intersecting Secants Theorem

Step 3: All we have to do now is solve for x! I use the product.sum method here, but choose the factoring method that best works for you!

Intersecting Secants Theorem

Step 4: Since we have to reject one of our answers, that leaves us with our one and only solution x=2.

Screen Shot 2020-07-14 at 10.14.41 PM.png

Ready to try the practice problems below on your own!?

Practice Questions: Find the value of the missing line segments x.

Intersecting Secants Theorem
Intersecting Secants Theorem

Solutions:

Screen Shot 2020-07-20 at 9.30.55 AM.png

Still got questions?  No problem! Check out the video above or comment below for any questions and follow for the latest MathSux posts. Happy calculating! 🙂

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To review a similar NYS Regents question check out this post here.

How to use SOH CAH TOA: Geometry

Welcome back to Mathsux! This week, we’re going to go over how to find missing angles and side lengths of right triangles by using trigonometric ratios (sine, cosine, and tangent) (aka how to use SOH CAH TOA).  Woo hoo! These are the basics of right triangle trigonometry, and provides the base for mastering so many more interesting things in trigonometry! So, let’s get to it!

Also, if you have any questions about anything here, don’t hesitate to comment below or watch the video below. Also, don;r forget to subscribe to Math Sux for FREE math videos, lessons, and practice questions every week. Happy calculating! 🙂

How to use SOH CAH TOA?

Trigonometric Ratios (more commonly known as Sine, Cosine, and Tangent) are ratios that naturally exist within a right triangle.  This means that the sides and angles of a right triangle are in proportion within itself.  It also means that if we are missing a side or an angle, based on what we’re given, we can probably find it!

Let’s take a look at what Sine, Cosine, and Tangent are all about!

How to use SOH CAH TOA
Screen Shot 2020-07-04 at 5.04.02 PM

Now let’s see how we can apply trig ratios when there is a missing side or angle in a right triangle!

Screen Shot 2020-07-04 at 5.17.47 PM
How to use SOH CAH TOA
Screen Shot 2020-07-04 at 5.15.19 PM
How to use SOH CAH TOA
Screen Shot 2020-07-04 at 5.05.01 PM.png
Screen Shot 2020-07-04 at 5.19.13 PM
How to use SOH CAH TOA

Now for another type of question; using trig functions to find missing angles, let’s take a look:

Screen Shot 2020-07-04 at 5.19.51 PM
How to use SOH CAH TOA

Try the following Practice Questions on your own!

How to use SOH CAH TOA

Solutions:

Screen Shot 2020-07-04 at 5.06.37 PM.png

Still got questions?  No problem! Check out the video the same examples outlined above and happy calculating! 🙂

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Need to brush up on special right triangles? Check out this posts on the 45 45 90 special triangles here!

Perpendicular & Parallel Lines Through a Given Point: Geometry

Happy Wednesday math friends! Today we’re going to go over the difference between perpendicular and parallel lines, then we’ll use our knowledge of the equation of a line (y=mx+b) to see how to find perpendicular and parallel lines through a given point.  This is a common question that comes up on the NYS Geometry Regents and is something we should prepare for, so let’s go!

If you need any further explanation, don’t hesitate to check out the Youtube video below that goes into detail on how to find perpendicular and parallel lines through a given point one step at a time. Happy calculating! 🙂

Perpendicular Lines:

Perpendicular & Parallel Lines Through a Given Point

Perpendicular Lines: Lines that intersect to create a 90-degree angle and can look something like the graph below.  Their slopes are negative reciprocals of each other which means they are flipped and negated. See below for example!

Example: Find an equation of a line that passes through the point (1,3) and is perpendicular to line y=2x+1 .

Screen Shot 2020-06-10 at 10.28.20 AM
Perpendicular & Parallel Lines Through a Given Point
Perpendicular & Parallel Lines Through a Given Point
Screen Shot 2020-06-10 at 10.29.06 AM

Parallel Lines:

Parallel lines are lines that go in the same direction and have the same slope (but have different y-intercepts). Check out the example below!

Perpendicular & Parallel Lines Through a Given Point

Example: Find an equation of a line that goes through the point (-5,1) and is parallel to line y=4x+2.

Screen Shot 2020-06-10 at 10.34.46 AM
Screen Shot 2020-06-10 at 10.35.23 AM

Try the following practice questions on your own!

Practice Questions:

1) Find an equation of a line that passes through the point (2,5) and is perpendicular to line y=2x+1.

 2) Find an equation of a line that goes through the point (-2,4) and is perpendicular to lineScreen Shot 2020-06-10 at 11.24.06 AM

 3)  Find an equation of a line that goes through the point (1,6) and is parallel to line y=3x+2.

4)  Find an equation of a line that goes through the point (-2,-2)  and is parallel to line y=2x+1.

Solutions:

Screen Shot 2020-06-10 at 11.22.05 AM

Need more of an explanation? Check out the video that goes over these types of questions up on Youtube (video at top of post) and let me know if you have still any questions.

Happy Calculating! 🙂

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Looking for more on Perpendicular and parallel lines? Check out this Regents question on perpendicular lines here!