NumWorks Calculator Review

Greeting math friends and welcome to MathSux! In today’s post we are going to review and take a look at how to use the graphing calculator available by the French company, NumWorks.

In this NumWorks calculator review, first impressions are that this is a serious competitor for Texas Instruments and offers more features than a typical calculator with a focus on statistics, data analysis, and even computer programming! Check out the video below to see the un-boxing, full review, and how to use this calculator step by step. Happy calculating! 🙂

NumWorks Calculator Stand Out Features:

NumWorks Calculator Review

1) The Home Screen: Works and looks like apps on an iPhone. It is super easy to use, and includes apps such as the regular graphing calculator we’re all used to, as well as, Python, Statistics, Probability, Equation Solver, Sequences, and Regression.

2) The Equation Solver: Punch in any function and find it’s x-values and discriminant! Very cool!

3) Python: Yes, this calculator is programmable via Python! It also includes pre-made scripts that you can easily run. This is great for aspiring programmers and important for today’s economy.

4) Exam Mode: Teachers can make students put their calculators in exam mode and watch their students calculators light up in red to prove there’s no cheating funny business going on! Warning though, this will delete all of your data including the pre-made Python scripts. But you can always hit the reset button in the back to reset.

NumWorks Calculator Review

Did I mention math teacher’s can potentially get a free calculator from NumWorks? Check out the link here!

Has anyone else tried this graphing calculator from NumWorks? What were your first thoughts? Let me know in the comments and happy calculating!

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For more math resources, check out this post here and happy calculating! 🙂

How to Calculate Z-Score?: Statistics

Hi there and welcome to MathSux! In this post, we are going to explore how to calculate z-score and the normal distribution. We’ll do this by examining the normal curve and learning how to find probability finding z-score and using the mean, standard deviation, and specific data points. Fore more info and more MathSix don’t forget to check out the video and practice questions below. Happy calculating!

What is a Normal Curve?

A normal curve is a bell shaped curve that shows the distribution of data evenly spread with respect to the mean. If you look at the normal curve below, the area under the curve shows all the possible probabilities of a certain data point occurring, notice the curve is higher towards the center mean, μ, and gets smaller as the distance from μ grows. The distance from μ is measured by the standard deviation, a unique unit of measurement that is specific to each group of data.

Mean: The mean always falls directly in the center of our normal curve. It is the average of our data, and always falls right in the middle.

Standard Deviation:  This value is used as a standard unit of measurement for the data, measuring the distance between each data point in relation to the mean throughout the entire data set. For a review on what standard deviation is and how to calculate it, check out this post here.

Now for our normal curve:

Notice half of the data is below the mean, μ, while the other half is above? The normal curve is symmetrical about the mean, μ!

How to Calculate Z-Score?

Z Score can tell us at what percentile a certain point in the data set falls in relation to the rest of the mean by using the standard deviation as a unit of measurement.  If this sounds confusing, it’s ok! Take a look at the following formula:

How to Calculate Z-Score?

We use the above formula in conjunction with  a z table which tells us the probability under the curve for a certain point.

Solution:

a) What percent of student scored below 500?

Step 1: First, let’s draw out our given information the mean=500, standard deviation=100, and the data point the question is asking for x=500 onto a normal curve. Notice that we want to find the value of the area under the curve shaded in pink.  This will tell us the percent of students that scored below 500.

How to Calculate Z-Score?

Step 2: We need to find the z-score by, using the data point given to us x=500, the mean=500, and the standard deviation, sigma=100.

Step 3: Yes, we have a zero! Now we need to take our z table and line up our chart. Notice that the chart finds the probability for everything at the beginning of the normal curve and on.  This is perfect for answering our question!

How to Calculate Z-Score?

Step 4: The table gives us our solution of .5000.  If we multiply .5000 times 100 it gives us the percent of students who scored below 500 at 50%.

b) What percent of student scored above 620?

Step 1: First, let’s draw out our given information the mean=500, standard deviation=100, and the data point the question is asking for x=620 onto a normal curve. Notice that we want to find the value of the area under the curve shaded in pink.  This will tell us the percent of students that scored above 620.

How to Calculate Z-Score?

Step 2: We need to find the z-score by, using the data point given to us x=620, the mean=500, and the standard deviation, sigma=100.

How to Calculate Z-Score?

Step 3: Yes, we got 1.2! Now we need to take our z table and line up our chart. Notice that the chart finds the probability for everything at the beginning of the normal curve and on.  This is means to find the percent we are looking for, we need to subtract our answer from one since we want the value of probability on the right side of the curve (the z-table only provides the left side).

How to Calculate Z-Score?

Step 4: The table gives us our solution of .8849.  If we subtract this value from 1 then multiply that value times 100 it gives us the percent of students who scored above 620.

How to Calculate Z-Score?

C) What is the highest score a student could receive if the students was in the 16.11th percentile?

Step 1: In this question we have to work backwards by first identifying, where on the z-score table is the number .1611 and then filling in our z score formula to find x, the missing data point (in this case test score).

Search the table for .1611:

How to Calculate Z-Score?

Notice that .1611 can be found on the z-table above with z-score -0.99.  This is what we’ll use to find the unknown data point!

Step 2: We need to find the unknown test score by, using the z score we just found z=-0.99, the mean=500, and the standard deviation, sigma=100.

How to Calculate Z-Score?

Step 3: Solve for x.

How to Calculate Z-Score?

Practice Questions:

The grades on a final English exam are normally distributed with a mean of 75 and a standard deviation of 10.

a) What percent of students scored below a 60?

b) What percent of students scored above an 89?

c) What is the highest possible grade that included in the 4.46th percentile?

d) What percent of students got at least a 77?

Solutions:

a) 6.68%

b) 8.08%

c) 58

d) 42.07%

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Variance and Standard Deviation: Statistics

Greetings math friends! In this post we’re going to go over variance and standard deviation. We will take this step by step to and explain the significance each have when it comes to a set of data. Get your calculators ready because this step by step although not hard, will take some serious number crunching! Check out the video below to see how to check your work using a calculator and happy calculating! 🙂

What is the Variance?

The variance represents the spread of data or distance each data point is from the mean.  When we have multiple observations in our data, we want to know how far each unit of data is from the mean.  Are all the data points close together or spread far apart?  This is what the variance tells us!

Don’t freak out but here’s the formula for variance, notated as sigma squared:

Variance and Standard Deviation

This translates to:

variance formula

Let’s try an example:

variance formula
Variance and Standard Deviation
Variance and Standard Deviation
Variance and Standard Deviation
Variance and Standard Deviation
Variance and Standard Deviation

What is Standard Deviation?

Standard deviation is a unit of measurement that is unique to each data set and is used to measure the spread of data. The formula for standard deviation happens to be very similar to the variance formula!

Below is the formula for standard deviation, notated as sigma:

sample standard deviation

Since this is the same exact formula as variance with a square root, all we need to do is take the square root of the variance to find standard deviation:

sample standard deviation

Now try calculating these statistics on your own with the following practice problems!

Practice Questions:

sample standard deviation

Solutions:

sample standard deviation

Still got questions? No problem! Don’t hesitate to comment with any questions or check out the video above. Happy calculating! 🙂

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Also! If you’re looking for more statistics, check out this post on how to create and analyze box and whisker plots here!