Solving Radical Equations: Algebra 2/Trig.

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Today we’re back with Algebra 2, this time solving for radical equations!  Did you say “Radical Equations?” As in wild and crazy equations? No, not exactly, radicals in math are used to take the square root, cubed root, or whatever root of a number.

Solving Radical Equations
Solving Radical Equations

Example #1:

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Radicals are actually pretty cool because we can write them a couple of different ways and they all mean the same thing! Check it out below:Still not sure of their coolness? Let’s see what they look like with actual numbers:
Example: Solve the following algebraic equation below for the missing variable (aka, solve for x).Explanation:

How do I answer this question?   

The question wants us to solve for x using our knowledge of radicals and algebra. You can also check out how to solve this question on Youtube here!

How do we do this? 

Step 1: We start solving this radical equation like any other algebraic problem: by getting x alone. We can do this easily by subtracting 7 and then dividing out 5.

Solving Radical Equations

Step 2: Now, to get rid of that pesky radical, we need to square the entire radical.  Remember, whatever we do to one side of the equation, we must also do to the other side of the equation, therefore, we also square 14 on the other side of the equal sign. *This gets rid of our radical and allows us to solve for x algebraically as normal!

Solving Radical Equations
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What happens when there is a cubed root though!?!?

When dividing polynomials with different value roots, raise the entire radical to that same power of root to cancel it out:Remember, we know radicals can also be written as fractions:

Solving Radical Equations

Therefore we also know that if we raise the entire radical expression to the same power of the root, the two exponents will cancel each other out:

Solving Radical Equations

Example #2:

Solving Radical Equations

Want more practice? Try solving radical equations in the next few examples on your own. 

Practice:

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Solutions:

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Looking to brush up on how to solve absolute value equations? Check out the post here! Did I miss anything?  Don’t let any questions go unchecked and let me know in the comments! Happy calculating! 🙂 

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Dividing Polynomials: Algebra 2/Trig.

Greeting math peeps! In this post we are going to go over dividing polynomials! At some point, you may need to know how to answer these types of questions. The cool thing about dividing polynomials is that it’s the same long division you did way back in grade school (except now with a lot of x). Ok, let’s get to it and check out the question below:

Also, if you haven’t done so, check out the video related that corresponds to this problem on Youtube below! 🙂

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Explanation:

How do I answer this question?

The question wants us to divide polynomials by using long division.

How do we do this?     

Step 1: First we set up a good ole’ division problem with the divisor, dividend, and quotient to solve.

Dividing Polynomials

Step 2: Now we use long division like we used to back in the day! If you have any confusion about this please check out the video in this post.

Dividing Polynomials
Dividing Polynomials

What if there’s a Remainder?

What happens when there is a remainder though!?!? When dividing polynomials with a remainder in the quotient, the answer is found and checked in a very similar way! Check it out in the example below:

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Dividing Polynomials

Notice we represented the remainder by adding Screen Shot 2020-05-04 at 10.35.06 PM to our quotient! We just put the remainder over the divisor to represent this extra bit of solution.

Want more practice? Try solving these next few examples on your own. 

Practice Questions:

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Solutions:

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If you’re looking for more on dividing polynomials, check out this post on synthetic division and finding zeros here!

Still got questions? No problem! Don’t hesitate to comment with any questions or check out the video above. Happy calculating! 🙂

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Binomial Cubic Expansion: Algebra 2/Trig.

Hey math friends! In this post, we are going to go over Binomial Cubic Expansion by going step by step! We’ll start by reviewing an old Regents question. Then, to truly master the topic, try the practice problems at the end of this post on your own! And, if you still have questions, don’t hesitate to watch the video or comment below. Thanks for stopping by and happy calculating! 🙂

Also, if you’re looking for more on Binomial Cubic Expansion, check out this post here!

What are Cubed Binomials?

Binomials are two-termed expressions, and now we are cubing them with a triple exponent! See how to tackle these types of problems with the example below:

Binomial Cubic Expansion

How do I answer this question?

We need to do an algebraic proof to see if (a+b)3=a3+b3.

How do we do this?

We set each expression equal to one another, and try to get one side to look like the other by using FOIL and distributing. In this case, we will be expanding (a+b)3 to equal (a+b)(a+b)(a+b).

Binomial Cubic Expansion
Binomial Cubic Expansion

Extra Tip! Notice that we used something called FOIL to combine (a+b)(a+b).  But what does that even mean? FOIL is an acronym for multiplying the two terms together.  It’s a way to remember to distribute each term to one another.  Take a look below:

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Add and combine all like terms together and we get Screen Shot 2019-05-24 at 9.04.45 AM.png!

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Rational Exponents: Algebra 2/Trig.

Hi everyone and welcome to MathSux! In this post we are going to break down and solve rational exponents. The words may sound like a mouthful, but all rational exponents are, are fractions as exponents. So instead of having x raised to the second power, such as x2, we might have x raised to the one-half power, such as x(1/2). Let’s try an example taken straight from the NYS Regents below. Also, if you have any questions don’t hesitate to comment below or check out the video posted here. Happy calculating! 🙂

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How do I answer this question?

The questions want us to simplify the rational exponents into something we can understand.

How do we do this?

We are going to convert the insane looking rational exponents into radical and solve/see if we can simplify further.

Reminder!

A radical can be converted into a rational exponent and vice versa. Not sure what that means? It’s ok! Take a gander at the examples below and look for a pattern:

Rational Exponents:

Think you’re ready to take on our original problem? #Letsdothis

Example:

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Rational Exponents:

Practice:

Rational Exponents:

Solutions:

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Still got questions?  Don’t hesitate to comment below for anything that still isn’t clear! Looking to review how to solve radical equations? Check out this post here! 🙂

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Solving Trigonometric Equations: Algebra 2/Trig.

Howdy math friends! In this post, we are going to learn about solving trigonometric equations algebraically.  This will combine our knowledge of algebra and trigonometry into one beautiful question! For more on trigonometric functions and right triangle trigonometry check out this post here.

Solving trigonometric equations. Sound complicated? Well, you are correct, that does sound complicated. Is it complicated? Hopefully, you won’t fund it that way after you’ve seen this example. We are going to do this step by step in the following regents question:

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How do I answer this question?

The questions want us to solve for x.

Step 1: Pretend this was any other equation and you wanted to solve for x. Thinking that way, we can move radical 2 to the other side.

Solving Trigonometric Equations

Solving Trigonometric Equations

Step 3: Now we need a value for x. This is where I turn to my handy dandy reference triangle. (This is a complete reference tool that you should memorize know). For more on special triangles, check out this post here.

Solving Trigonometric Equations
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Solving Trigonometric Equations

Step 5: Notice that cosine is positive in Quadrants I and IV. That means there are two values that x can be (one in each quadrant). We already have x=45º from Quadrant I. In order to get that other value in Quadrant IV, we must subtract 360º-45º=315º giving us our other value.

Does this make sense? Great! 🙂 Is it clear as mud? I have failed. But I have not given up (and neither should you). Ask more questions, look for the spots where you got lost, do more research and never give up! 🙂

Hopefully you enjoyed my short motivational speech. For more encouraging words and math, check out MathSux on the following websites! Sign up for FREE math videos, lessons, practice questions, and more. Thanks for stopping by and happy calculating! 🙂

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Factor by Grouping: Algebra 2/Trig.

Hey math friends! In this post, we are going to go over Factor by Grouping, one of the many methods for factoring a quadratic equation.  There are so many methods to factor quadratic equations, but this is a great choice, for when a is greater than 1. Also, if you need to review different types of factoring methods, just check out this link here.  Stay curious and happy calculating! 🙂 Before we go any further, let’s just take a quick look at what a quadratic equation is: Usually, we can just find the products, the sum, re-write the equation, solve for x, and be on our merry way.  But if you notice, there is something special about the question below. The coefficient “a” is greater than 1/. This is where factor by grouping comes in handy! Now that we know why and when we need to factor by grouping lets take a look at our Example: factor by groupingFactor by Grouping Factor by Grouping

Factor By Grouping: Hard to solve? No.  Hard to remember? It can be, just remember to practice, practice practice! Also, if you are in need of a review of other methods of factoring quadratic equations, click this link here.

Want more Mathsux?  Don’t forget to check out our Youtube channel and more below! And if you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to comment. Happy Calculating! 🙂

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Recursive Formula: Algebra

Howdy math peeps! In this post, we are going to go over the recursive formula step by step by reviewing a Regent’s question. Yes, it is the recursive formula jam, well at least it’s my kind of jam.  These things may look weird, confusing, and like a “what am I doing?” moment, but trust me they are no so bad!

How do I answer this question?

At first glance, all of these answer choices may look exactly the same. The first thing I would want to do with this question is to identify how all of theses answer choices are different. Take a look below:

What is the Recursive Formula?

A Recursive Formula is a formula that forms a sequence based on the previous term value. All this means is that it uses a formula to form a sequence-based pattern.

Let’s go through each choice to identify the answer:

Our goal is to test out each choice given, until we get the desired sequence:

What is the recursive formula
What is the recursive formula
What is the recursive formula

Still have questions about recursive formulas? Check out more on recursive formulas here!

Still got questions? No problem! Check out the video above for more or try the NYS Regents question below, and please don’t hesitate to comment with any questions. Happy calculating! 🙂

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Solving Log Equations: Algebra 2/Trig.

Ahoy math friends! In this post, we are going to focus on solving log equations by solving this Regents questions step by step. We’ll answer this question right away! But if you need more of a review, keep reading and you will find what logarithms are, the different kinds of logarithms rules, and some simpler examples. Ready for our first example?! Check it out below:

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How do I Answer this Question?

Step 1: Let’s re-write the equation to get rid of the “log.”

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Solving Log Equations

Step 2: Solve for x in our new equation (5x-1)(1/3)=4

Solving Log Equations

If the above answer makes sense to you, great! If not, that’s ok too, keep reading for a review on solving log equations.

What are Logarithms?

Logarithms are inverses of exponential equations. Take a look below for a clearer picture.

Solving Log Equations

Basic Formula:

Logarithms can be re-written to get rid of the word “log.” This makes them easier to solve and understand.

Solving Log Equations
Solving Log Equations

Log Rules:

There are a few rules you have to memorize get used to with practice. These rules are used when solving for x in different kinds of algebraic log problems:

Solving Log Equations

Still got questions?  No problem! Check out the videos below and the post here for more on logarithms! Also don’t forget to subscribe below to get the latest FREE math videos, lessons, and practice questions from MathSux. Thanks for stopping by and happy calculating! 🙂

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